Make your own free website on Tripod.com

National and Historical Flags of Georgia
If you surfed directly to this page, please visit our main page





Current Flag
The Flag of Georgia in XI-XII centuries
The Royal Banner and Coat of Arms of the Bagration Dynasty
Flags of the Regions of Georgia XIII-XVIII centuries, according to Vakhushti Batonishvili
Flags of the Transcaucasian Federation, 1918-1936/37
Official Flags in 1918-1921
Official Flag in 1940s
Official Flag in 1951-1989
Borjgali

Coat of Arms of the Georgian Cities
 

Current Flag

Following the events of the "Rose Revolution" in October 2003, new President Mikhail Saakashvili began changing the state symbols of Georgia. The flag of the 1918 Republic (see below) was changed to the five-cross flag (also see below) and work is underway on other state symbols as well (anthem, coat of arms and etc).

Ancient Banner

National Flag in 1991-2003 was the flag of 1918 Republic. It came into use when Georgia proclaimed its independence in 1917 and was resurrected upon the breakup of the Soviet Union. The dark red colour is regarded as the national colour. The black and white stripes stand for the country's tragic past and hopes for the future. Flag was used between 1918 and 1921 (with variations)and then readopted on 14 November 1990; it was changed to the five-cross flag in January 2004. The coat of arms adopted 11 December 1990.

The official Coat of Arms represent octagonal with image of St. George in the center, and images of the St. George, with the Sun, the Moon and 5 planets (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn) above him.
 
National flag

 
 

Go Up


The Flag of Georgia in V-XI centuries

The flag representated a white banner with an image of St. George in the center.
 
 

Go Up

The Flag of Georgia in XII-XV centuries; Often used in religious and state ceremoniesthroughout the 1990s, this banner was declared national flag in January 2004.

Originally, this banner was attributed to Jerusalem and symbolized the Holy Cross and nails with which Jesus Christ was crucified.

The historical tradition constituted one of the reasons for accepting this flag as a state one. Starting from the Early Medieval, the Georgians founded numerous monasteries in Palestine. Among those in the area of Jerusalem were St. Saba in the Judean wilderness, the convent near the place of the martyrdom of St. James the Great and the Monastery of the Holy Cross.  In the XIII - XIV centuries the Georgians enjoyed a privileged condition above the other Christians. This was especially so after glorious years of King David and Queen Tamar, and during the dynasty of the Mameluk Sultans, who often were originally form Georgia. James de Vitry wrote that while most Christians entered Jerusalem with difficulty and lived a most tenuous existence, the Georgians were able to move about freely. In fact, when Georgian pilgrims arrived they entered the city with flags unfurled and held high. They were not required to pay the tax which was imposed upon other Christians. (Iacobus de Vitriaco, Historia Ierosolymitana seu Orientalis, c. LXXIX (De Sandoli, Itinera, III, 352-353).
 
Ancient Banner

Go Up

The Royal Banner and Coat of Arms of the Bagration Dynasty

The flag can be divided into four panels:

Central Panel: The Tunic of Our Savior Jesus Christ - According to the tradition, the Tunic was recovered after the Crucifixion and brought to Mtskheta, ancient capital of Georgia, where it is buried under the Svetitskhoveli Cathedral.

Top Left Panel: The Slin with which David killed Goliath and David's harp, symbolizing Bagration's claim to descent from King David of Israel.

Top Right Panel: The Royal Orb and Crossed Swords

Bottom Left Panel: The Scales of Justice

Bottom Right Panel: St. George killing the dragon.
St. George is the patron saint of Georgia. Though "Georgian" St. George has many archaic features, combing charcteristics of pagan deities. It is believed that there are more than 365 churches built to St. George in Georgia
 
 

Go Up


Flags of the Regions of Georgia XIII-XVIII centuries, according to Vakhushti Batonishvili
 
 

Abkhazeti 

Imereti 

Kartli 

Rani 

Svaneti 

Odishi 

Kakheti 

Ovseti 

Shirvani 

 Guria 

Samtskhe-Javakheti
Go Up

Flags of the Transcaucasian Federation, 1918-1936/37

The Transcaucasian federation was established in the beginning of 1918 and lasted for some three months, until Georgia proclaimed independence in May 1918. The Georgian flag during the membershipo in this short-lifed federation was a tricolor based on the German banner.

Transcaucasian Flag

After the annexation of Georgia in February 1921, the Transcaucasian Federation was re-established, combining Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaidjan, and later joined the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. During 1922-1937 period the state flag of Georgia was that of the Federation.

The initial flag of the re-established Federation was red banner with initials of name of this federation - ZSFSR [Transcaucasian Soviet Federation of Socialist Republics]. In thirties the flag was modified, and Star with hammer and sickle in it were added.
 
Transcaucasian Transcaucasian Flag2


Official Flag in 1918-1921

After almost 200 years of Russian dominance, Georgia became independent in 1918. The national flag in this period (1918-1921) was the same as the present flag though the the dimensions were slightly different. This was flown as standard of the Transcaucasian Federation 22 April 1918 when the Federation was formed, and as the flag of independent Georgia from 26 May 1918 until the Red Army invaded in February 1921.

The Georgian flag was designed by Jakob Nikoladze who won a contest, and was accepted by the Georgian authorities on 25 March 1917. O 22 May 1918, Georgia proclaimed independence under this flag.
 
 
National flag

Go Up


Official Flag in 1940s

Flag of the Socialist Republic of Georgia in 1940s. It was designed on the patter on the RSFSR flag - the red banner with inscription in Georgian  "Saqartvelos SSR" - " S[oviet] S[ocialist] R[epublic] of Georgia "
 

1937 flag

Go Up


Flag and Coat of Arms in 1951-1989

State flag of Georgia was adopted on 11 April 1951. Red hammer and sickle with star in a blue sun in canton, blue bar in upper part of flag. Coat of Arms contained a hammer and sickle superimposed on the background of the Caucasus Mountains, with a motto "Workers of All Countries Unite" in Georgian and Russian languages written in circle around them. The outer layer of the coat of arms represents a seven-angled star within a circle, with a Georgian traditional motif of vine branches and leaves used to create an elaborate border.

Go Up

 
Borjgali
borjgali borjgali

Borjgali is an ancient Georgian symbol of the Sun and is related to the Messopotamian and Sumerian symbols of the eternity and the Sun. The left image is of complex structure. It is usually depicted within the Circle, that symbolises the Universe. In the lower part of the image there is the Tree of Life. The roots of the Tree go into the "past" and its palm-like branches are for the "future". The Tree itself sumbolizes the continuity between past, present and the future. The Borjgali is usually placed above the tree and symbolizes the Sun, eternal movement and Life. Nowadays, the symbol is used in Georgian IDs and passports, as well as on currency. Also Borjgali is used as a seal of the Basque-Georgian Friendship Association.

Go Up

 
 
If you surfed directly to this page, please visit our main page